5 Comments

Why the Xbox One DRM Controversy Has Saved the Gaming Industry (and Made the PS4 a Better Console)

Xbox 180Even with Microsoft doing a complete Xbox 180 on their DRM and always-on policies for the Xbox One (due to what was probably the largest internet backlash of all time), gamers – being the stubborn bunch that we are – are largely unhappy with the Xbox One still. A mixture of not trusting the company any more, feeling resentment for the decision in the first place or, in rare cases, disagreeing with the turnaround completely means that although the Xbox One is now looking like a decent console and a strong competitor, it’s likely damaged Xbox One sales significantly in the long-run still.

But let’s look at the bigger picture here. Assuming you hated the DRM policies originally imposed upon the Xbox One and wanted it to be changed, would you rather it had never had happened at all and that when the Xbox One was announced it was originally revealed to be more-or-less how it’s looking now?

If you would, consider this: Microsoft’s original plan and the controversy surrounding it was a great thing.

We knew for a long time that one day, DRM would be imposed upon a generation of consoles and that, unfortunately, it’d likely be the future of gaming. However, with gamers being such an outspoken and frankly difficult market, now that somebody’s tested these waters (that somebody being one of the biggest console brands out there, no less) and been confronted with an absolute torrent of hatred, it’ll be a long bloody time before any console manufacturer or game publisher decides to take DRM head-on again.

The outpouring of hatred towards Microsoft and their upcoming console for the would-be DRM policies means that they’ve indirectly made crystal-clear point to other companies: DRM is a big no-no – it’s a dead zone and it’s corporate suicide to embrace it. Heck, even the PlayStation 4 will be a better console for this turnaround as publishers will be beyond foolish to even consider any DRM, anti-used game policies any more.

So, thanks for securing the future of DRM-free consoles Microsoft. I salute your sacrifice.

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About Ryan Brown

Commonly going by the alias 'Toadsanime' online, Ryan Brown acts as Coin Arcade's editor and primary writer. With an avid interest in various aspects of gaming -- including general gaming, indie gaming, retro gaming and merchandise collecting -- he aspires to build a career in the video game journalism industry. He also writes his own descriptions as if talking about somebody else, apparently.

5 comments on “Why the Xbox One DRM Controversy Has Saved the Gaming Industry (and Made the PS4 a Better Console)

  1. Yes it may be true that Microsoft took the bullet for DRM gaming but their intetnion was clear. they wanted games to be more exclusive to a single player rather than the community. The purpose of any video game company or any entertainment company should be is to bring people together not to pull them away by adding this new DRM policy Microsoft is potentially eliminating interactions between friends that love sharing games with each other.

    • I should note, then, that I too despised the DRM policies originally planned for implementation on the Xbox One.

      I’m not suggesting that the DRM policies were good, rather that the repercussions of the backlash are. I still think they were crazy to think that they’d be able to pull off a console teeming with DRM restrictions.

  2. […] Why the Xbox One DRM Controversy Has Saved the Gaming Industry (and Made the PS4 a Better Console) (coinarcade.org) […]

  3. […] Why the Xbox One DRM Controversy Has Saved the Gaming Industry (and Made the PS4 a Better Console) (coinarcade.org) […]

  4. […] Why the Xbox One DRM Controversy Has Saved the Gaming Industry (and Made the PS4 a Better Console) (coinarcade.org) […]

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